The Sacramento City Unified School District will welcome thousands of students back to class on Thursday. Teachers spent much of Wednesday preparing their classrooms. Here are three things to know about Sacramento Unified Schools Reopening Plan:Teachers will teach students in-person and remote at the same timeThe SUSD is using a concurrent model. That means teachers will simultaneously teach students who are in the classroom and those who are at home. The district is using a phased approach to reopening its schools. Thursday, April 8, grades Ek-3 and K-6 Special Day Classes will resume. Each week thereafter, the district will open for different grade segments (April 15 for fourth through sixth graders, followed by April 22 for seventh through 12th graders). Some students will split their week, sometimes physically in class and other times learning at home.How the school district is handling COVID-19 safetyIn addition to signs telling students to wear masks, practice social distancing and wash hands, screening equipment has been installed at the entrances. Thermal scanners to read temperatures will be used. The district has also made upgrades to the ventilation systems and installed HEPA-rated air filtration units in classrooms to ensure that there are continuous flows of fresh air.What parents are sayingParents who spoke to KCRA 3 said they’re ready for their children to return to the classroom and they support the district’s plan. “When you’re in class it’s more of an interaction; it’s one on one. It’s interpersonal and I think we need to get back to that. I do like that they will be distance learning. They’re going to be separated. They’re going to be in the class and be with their peers. They’ll still be able to go out on the blacktop. That stuff is important to kids right now,” Angela Arrington said. Isaac Gonzalez has two kids, a fourth-grader and a kindergartener — who will be going to school in person for the very first time.His family is happy, yet cautious about the changes. “Getting used to the various cohorts, drop off days, pick up days, when our students will and won’t be on campus when they’ll be distanced learning – it’s going to be a bit of a learning curve to figure it out, but we’re willing to give the district and staff the benefit of the doubt and try this thing out and see if it works,” he said.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The Sacramento City Unified School District will welcome thousands of students back to class on Thursday. Teachers spent much of Wednesday preparing their classrooms.
Here are three things to know about Sacramento Unified Schools Reopening Plan:Teachers will teach students in-person and remote at the same timeThe SUSD is using a concurrent model. That means teachers will simultaneously teach students who are in the classroom and those who are at home. The district is using a phased approach to reopening its schools. Thursday, April 8, grades Ek-3 and K-6 Special Day Classes will resume. Each week thereafter, the district will open for different grade segments (April 15 for fourth through sixth graders, followed by April 22 for seventh through 12th graders). Some students will split their week, sometimes physically in class and other times learning at home.How the school district is handling COVID-19 safetyIn addition to signs telling students to wear masks, practice social distancing and wash hands, screening equipment has been installed at the entrances. Thermal scanners to read temperatures will be used. The district has also made upgrades to the ventilation systems and installed HEPA-rated air filtration units in classrooms to ensure that there are continuous flows of fresh air.What parents are sayingParents who spoke to KCRA 3 said they’re ready for their children to return to the classroom and they support the district’s plan. “When you’re in class it’s more of an interaction; it’s one on one. It’s interpersonal and I think we need to get back to that. I do like that they will be distance learning. They’re going to be separated. They’re going to be in the class and be with their peers. They’ll still be able to go out on the blacktop. That stuff is important to kids right now,” Angela Arrington said. Isaac Gonzalez has two kids, a fourth-grader and a kindergartener — who will be going to school in person for the very first time.His family is happy, yet cautious about the changes. “Getting used to the various cohorts, drop off days, pick up days, when our students will and won’t be on campus when they’ll be distanced learning – it’s going to be a bit of a learning curve to figure it out, but we’re willing to give the district and staff the benefit of the doubt and try this thing out and see if it works,” he said.