THEY HAD ROUGHLY 14,000 SLOTS OPEN FOR PEOPLE TO GET THEIR VACCINES, BUT AS YOU CAN SEE THESE SEATS ARE EMPTY. I THINK WE’LL GET AROUND A THOUSAND PEOPLE THAT SHOW UP AMY LAPSE PRESIDENT. SEAN BOWMAN SAYS, THIS IS THE SLOWEST MASS VACCINATION EVENT. THEY’VE SEEN SO FAR SAYING FOR SOME REASON DEMAND HAS BEEN ON THE DECLINE SINCE LAST WEEK. I KNOW IN THE RURAL PARTS OF T SURPRISING THAT EVENTUALLY IT WOULD HAPPEN IN THE METRO JUST SURPRISING THAT IT WOULD HAPPEN ALREADY AND SAYS HE’S STILL CONCERNED. THERE ARE A THIRD OF OKLAHOMA’S STILL ON THE FENCE ABOUT GETTING THE SHOT IF YOU KEEP PUTTING IT OFF WHAT’S GONNA END UP HAPPENING IS YOU’RE GONNA GET TO A POINT WHERE IT’S GONNA BE HARD TO FIND A PLACE TO GET A VACCINE AND THE DEPUTY COMMISSIONER SAYS THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT WORKING TO REMOVE REMOVE BARRIERS FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE SCENE IT’S EASY TO GET AN APPOINTMENT EXPECT TO SEE MORE WALK-IN TYPE APPOINTMENTS. WE WE REALLY WANT TO MAKE IT CONVENIENT FOR THE PUBLIC SO THAT THERE’S GOOD REASON TO GET VACCINATED. WE CAN’T FORCE PEOPLE TO GET VACCINES. THEY NEED TO MAKE THAT CHOICE. AND AND THIS IS REALLY HONESTLY IT’S ABOUT LOVING YOUR NEIGHBO

Oklahoma to open COVID-19 vaccine eligibility to nonresidents starting Thursday

Updated: 4:02 PM CDT Apr 7, 2021

The Oklahoma State Department of Health announced that the state will open COVID-19 vaccine to nonresidents, starting Thursday, April 8.Officials said this makes Oklahoma one of the first states in the U.S. to do so.According to the OSDH, due to increasing supply and continued progress in vaccination efforts, the state will remove the residency requirement for receiving the COVID-19 vaccine in Oklahoma effective April 8, allowing residents from neighboring states and beyond to get the vaccine.“While our focus has been and will continue to be on vaccinating Oklahomans, we have always known there would be a point at which supply and increasing capacity would allow us to welcome residents from neighboring states into Oklahoma to get vaccinated,” said Deputy Commissioner Keith Reed. “We are now reaching that point and are happy to extend a welcome to our neighbors as part of our efforts to help stop the spread of COVID-19 in the region. This virus does not adhere to boundaries drawn on a map, so by ensuring high vaccination rates across the region — not just Oklahoma — we are providing an extra layer of protection for our residents.”Oklahoma would be among the first states in the nation to officially remove its residency requirement for the COVID-19 vaccine, a major step in distribution that reinforces the state’s success in administering the vaccine to its own residents, officials said. Last week, OSDH announced the state passed 2 million total doses administered, remaining a national leader in vaccine administration rates.“With supply consistently increasing week over week, additional access points coming on board each day and Oklahomans able to find readily available appointments across the state, we have a lot to be hopeful about in the coming months. But it’s going to require a continued commitment to our mitigation efforts,” said Commissioner of Health Dr. Lance Frye. “Now is not the time to let our guard down. We encourage Oklahomans to remain vigilant in following the three Ws as we work to vaccinate as many people across the region as possible and return to a sense of normalcy. If you have not yet signed up for your vaccine, I urge you to do so as soon as possible — it’s the best thing you can do to protect yourself, your family and your community.”The vaccine is currently available at no cost to all Oklahomans age 16 and older. Sixteen and 17-year-olds can receive the Pfizer vaccine with parental consent and with a parent present at the vaccination site, officials said. The Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are available to those 18 years old and older.

OKLAHOMA CITY — The Oklahoma State Department of Health announced that the state will open COVID-19 vaccine to nonresidents, starting Thursday, April 8.Officials said this makes Oklahoma one of the first states in the U.S. to do so.
According to the OSDH, due to increasing supply and continued progress in vaccination efforts, the state will remove the residency requirement for receiving the COVID-19 vaccine in Oklahoma effective April 8, allowing residents from neighboring states and beyond to get the vaccine.“While our focus has been and will continue to be on vaccinating Oklahomans, we have always known there would be a point at which supply and increasing capacity would allow us to welcome residents from neighboring states into Oklahoma to get vaccinated,” said Deputy Commissioner Keith Reed. “We are now reaching that point and are happy to extend a welcome to our neighbors as part of our efforts to help stop the spread of COVID-19 in the region. This virus does not adhere to boundaries drawn on a map, so by ensuring high vaccination rates across the region — not just Oklahoma — we are providing an extra layer of protection for our residents.”Oklahoma would be among the first states in the nation to officially remove its residency requirement for the COVID-19 vaccine, a major step in distribution that reinforces the state’s success in administering the vaccine to its own residents, officials said. Last week, OSDH announced the state passed 2 million total doses administered, remaining a national leader in vaccine administration rates.
“With supply consistently increasing week over week, additional access points coming on board each day and Oklahomans able to find readily available appointments across the state, we have a lot to be hopeful about in the coming months. But it’s going to require a continued commitment to our mitigation efforts,” said Commissioner of Health Dr. Lance Frye. “Now is not the time to let our guard down. We encourage Oklahomans to remain vigilant in following the three Ws as we work to vaccinate as many people across the region as possible and return to a sense of normalcy. If you have not yet signed up for your vaccine, I urge you to do so as soon as possible — it’s the best thing you can do to protect yourself, your family and your community.”The vaccine is currently available at no cost to all Oklahomans age 16 and older. Sixteen and 17-year-olds can receive the Pfizer vaccine with parental consent and with a parent present at the vaccination site, officials said. The Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are available to those 18 years old and older.