The Iowa Department of Public Health confirmed Monday that the B.1.1.7. variant of COVID-19, commonly referred to as the U.K. variant, has been located in one of the state’s long-term care facilities. According to a news release from the Iowa DPH, cases of the variant have been detected in individuals who were partially or completely vaccinated against COVID-19.“The Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines are all highly effective at preventing severe COVID-19 illness and death, but no vaccine is 100% effective at preventing virus spread,” the Iowa DPH said in a statement. “As the percentage of Iowans who are fully vaccinated continues to increase, we would expect there will also be a small percentage of infections among people who have been vaccinated but whose immune systems didn’t develop a strong enough protective response.”The U.K. variant of COVID-19 is more transmissible than other variants of the virus.The Iowa DPH went on to emphasize that vaccination helps prevent extreme outcomes in individuals who test positive for COVID-19.The department encourages all Iowans to get tested for COVID-19 if they experience symptoms regardless of whether they have been vaccinated.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the B.1.1.7. variant of COVID-19 is currently the most common variant of the virus. The Iowa DPH said the variant is likely the most common variant in Iowa.The Iowa DPH encourages all Iowans to continue the use of face masks or coverings, practice social distancing, wash hands frequently with soap and water, stay home when feeling sick and receive a COVID-19 vaccine when eligible.Guidance for Iowans already fully vaccinated can be found here.

The Iowa Department of Public Health confirmed Monday that the B.1.1.7. variant of COVID-19, commonly referred to as the U.K. variant, has been located in one of the state’s long-term care facilities. According to a news release from the Iowa DPH, cases of the variant have been detected in individuals who were partially or completely vaccinated against COVID-19.
“The Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines are all highly effective at preventing severe COVID-19 illness and death, but no vaccine is 100% effective at preventing virus spread,” the Iowa DPH said in a statement. “As the percentage of Iowans who are fully vaccinated continues to increase, we would expect there will also be a small percentage of infections among people who have been vaccinated but whose immune systems didn’t develop a strong enough protective response.”The U.K. variant of COVID-19 is more transmissible than other variants of the virus.The Iowa DPH went on to emphasize that vaccination helps prevent extreme outcomes in individuals who test positive for COVID-19.The department encourages all Iowans to get tested for COVID-19 if they experience symptoms regardless of whether they have been vaccinated.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the B.1.1.7. variant of COVID-19 is currently the most common variant of the virus. The Iowa DPH said the variant is likely the most common variant in Iowa.The Iowa DPH encourages all Iowans to continue the use of face masks or coverings, practice social distancing, wash hands frequently with soap and water, stay home when feeling sick and receive a COVID-19 vaccine when eligible.Guidance for Iowans already fully vaccinated can be found here.